Posts Tagged ‘ohmynews’

The death of Japanese citizen journalism

The NY Times today addresses the closure of a citizen journalism site in Japan with a nod to our own OhmyNews. The article offers keen observations about the role of the state, the citizen and the medium, as well as the history of all three, for news’ future.

JanJan News closed three months ago, citing recent years’ financial morass as the final blow to its weak advertising revenue.

Reporter Martin Fackler notes:

JanJan was the last of four online newspapers offering reader-generated articles that were started with great fanfare here, but they have all closed or had to scale back their operations in the past two years.

He specifically references the OhmyNews experiment that launched in Japan in 2006, only to close about 18 months later. He also draws a comparison between the Korean and Japanese media environments, highlighting differences in culture and government.
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21

06 2010

South Korea and the need for speed

As an American living in South Korea, I’m learning the need, the need for speed.

The Koreans’ favorite phrase – bali, bali! – means “faster, faster!” and reflects its culture of high-speed growth. And it is not relegated to technology. The emphasis placed on efficiency can be seen at the dinner table, on the soccer field, and in classrooms.

It is the land of the future for those of us tangled in ethernet cords. Here are a few things I’ve noticed since my move to Korea:

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21

06 2010

Jay Rosen defines citizen journalism

Here’s a mental snack for the day. Check out Jay Rosen (read: 2.0 celebrity with thick black eyeglasses to match) and his definition of citizen journalism. It might seem obvious today, but was probably not so when it was published two years ago. He offers a substantive overview of the leading conversation on citizen journalism in its beginnings. The video is not to be missed.

One particular quote he pulled from another 2.0 celebrity Dan Gillmor:

As to who coined it first in its current, digital-age meaning, or at least came closest, I’m not sure there either. But I’d start with Oh Yeon Ho, founder of Korea’s OhmyNews, who said back in antiquity (2000) that “Every citizen is a reporter.” Mr. Oh is one of the real pioneers in this arena, as we would all agree.

Not that we are biased or anything.

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15

06 2010

In the beginning…

Clarify your understanding of citizen journalism. Challenge your preconceptions of what it means. Chart its future. We promise to provide you the most comprehensive and up-to-date discussion on citizen journalism.

Who: We are a small team based at OhmyNews in Seoul, South Korea. We are international journalists; we know technology; and we are curious about the global progress of citizen journalism. And we adore coffee always.

From our perch at OhmyNews, we have first-hand access and experience in citizen journalism. A decade since its pioneering start in 2000, OhmyNews receives 150 stories each day from  62,000 citizen contributors. The citizen journalism organization employs 70 full-time editors and reporters.

What: OMNI is the barometer for citizen journalism. In a Venn diagram between participatory media and news, OMNI makes the grey space its home. Grassroots journalism, citizen media, crowdsourcing are all related terms that tackle the same question: How are regular people making and changing the news?

Where: This space exists to serve you, wherever you live. Our goal is to be as global as possible. We operate out of Seoul, where the technological revolution started a decade ago. GPS trackers for buses, cell phones with television access and the latest wireless networks are commonplace here. We intend to share our observations on the speedy development.

Add content here.

When: Now. A press release goes out July 8, 2010 at the OhmyNews International Journalism Forum in Seoul.

Why: A one-stop shop for all things citizen journalism did not exist. This was a hole in the conversation about media and the Internet, and our position at OhmyNews means we are the best people to fill it. We see citizen journalism as a way to promote important subjects like free speech, identity, and privacy. And so, we want to offer a place to gauge the present and decide its future.

How: OMNI adds to the citizen journalism conversation in three ways.

We:

(1)  expose our own sourcelist. The Aggregator tab shows all the citizen journalism feeds we are currently tracking.  Dig to your heart’s content — but be warned, it’s machine-generated, so we can’t take responsibility for the content. And if you think we’re missing something, show us the light.

(2)  curate the news about citizen journalism.   We highlight the most important stories of the day with our own, original reporting.

(3)  publish essays on topics ranging from OhmyNews itself to the latest technologies and how they will enable future citizen journalists.

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06 2010