Posts Tagged ‘tools’

Oil spill crisis map

Report the effects of the oil spill as you see it via text message, e-mail, Twitter, android phone, iPhone or web form. Students at Tulane University are using the Ushahidi open source software to make a live tracking-system with a map, graphs and news feed.

This map utilizes public testimony to visualize the impact of the BP oil spill over time and geography. By using information that comes from participants we will be able to track, document and make public the effects of the BP oil spill. By making all information public we will facilitate transparency, accountability and effectiveness in the oil spill response and clean up.

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25

06 2010

YouTube brings video editing to the cloud

YouTube EditorYouTube has, once again, radically reduced the costs involved in creating and sharing video online.  It has released a web-based, video editing tool that is tightly integrated with its hosting services.  This further reduces the costs and complications of video-based citizen journalism.

While YouTube has been the primary place to share video online (they receive 24 hours of video every minute of every day), many people still use desktop-based tools to edit and compress their video before uploading.  This workflow carries two costs.  Obvious is the expense of software itself.  Some of these tools come pre-packaged with computers (Windows Movie Maker and iMovie), but others are expensive (Pinnacle and Final Cut Express).  Second, and more importantly, are the costs of owning hardware capable of editing video.  Working with HD video takes massive quantities of hard drive space and a fast CPU.

YouTube’s online editor changes all that.

Read the rest of this entry →

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17

06 2010

New tool for citizen journalists

Let’s say you want to make an argument about public education in your hometown. Students have created a goofproof tool for discovering the breakdown of education levels. Use hard numbers from American Visualizer, and your case moves further from opinion and closer to fact. The same is available for race, housing, age and gender.

Sure, you could mine the U.S. Census Bureau yourself. But hunting for information on the U.S. Census Bureau website is parallel to asking for a headache.

American Visualizer Screenshot

http://americanvisualizer.com

This is simple. So simple ANYONE can figure it out. Sounds like citizen journalism to me.

Rich Gordon, blogger and professor at the Medill School of Journalism talks about the new tool in the PBS MediaShift Idea Lab. He goes into greater detail about the fusion of technology and journalism, but the most exciting thing about it is the tool’s immediacy and simplicity. Don’t believe me? Just do it. Let me know if you disagree.

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16

06 2010