Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

‘Twitter censorship’ raises concerns from press freedom group

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Head of new media at press freedom group Reporters Without Borders says Twitter’s ability to ‘withhold’ content from users based on local restrictions could have ‘real consequences’ for journalists.

They are preparing an open letter to the chief executive of Twitter, to raise concerns about an announcement that the social media platform now has the power to “reactively withhold” tweets from users to meet country-based restrictions.

Read the full article on UK website Journalism.co.uk.

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Citizen Journalism Website Youreporter covering flash floods in Italian region of Liguria

The Northern Italian region of Liguria is currently being hit by flashfloods that are bringing the region’s main city of Genoa to its knees.

The citizen journalism website Youreporter is showing numerous videos of the different parts of the city as the tragic events are still unfolding. Facebook users are also uploading news and material on their pages thus contributing to spread information in the country through unofficial channels. While the authorities seem to have lost control of the unpredictable situation social media are inviting people to leave the city.

The mainstream media outlet Corriere della Sera is also remediating footage from Youreporter.

The emergency in Genoa continues.

 

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05

11 2011

Curating Citizen and Community News Stories

Journalists today are being urged to add context and curate news events for their viewer/users. As OMNI’s Joe McPherson says, just start with “…an article or video from a citizen journalism source and talk about it.” For lots of local news, this kind of simple reporting works well.

You can find a newsworthy post or photo or video, and add a bit of background information, some details, and explain the local connection or angle to the story, and it works for your audience.

There are stories, even local stories, that end up generating streams of comments and SMS-style updates, related photos, or videos but as they are posted in real time, they don’t create a structured narrative.

Reporters today need to learn how to verify, source, and analyze social information streams to provide context. Curating is adding a structure or frame to this social stream, reducing redundancy or echo in the messages, and writi

ng what you know best, and just  linking  to the rest.

I found a small but important example of this new kind of reporting on one of Chicago’s Everyblock community sections. From the initial question about an incident of  indecent exposure– a “flasher” –near an elementary school, a discussion ensures about the flasher and what can be done. Then a community reporter,  tipped to the stream by his publisher, uses the community site to get in contact with the victim. The reporter followed up on the story, which ended with the apprehension and arrest of the flasher. The reporter published the story in print, but then posted it back on the community site.

Most of the interesting reading, from the comments to the timeline, to the reporter’s version of the story, happened online as part of Everyblock’s community section for Bowmanville/Ravenswood, or via Twitter. If I tried to copy/paste and link them here, it would have been a big job. Instead, I used a new tool, storify.com, that let’s a reporter easily integrate social media from multiple social networks into a storyline, with drag and drop. It preserves all attribution and metadata of each element, and is set up for easy sharing when your story is finished.

You can read and view how the social media are formatted automatically with the metadata and links for yourself. You will be able to view the discussion as it happened. What do you think of this method of curating a story? Want to talk about it? Leave a comment.

The Future of News is Social, Local, and Gets a Flasher off the Streets – storify.com.

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08

06 2011

Twitter hampering criminal investigations UK police warn

Messages on social networking sites are increasingly hampering major police investigations, a senior detective has warned.

The comment came from Detective Chief Inspector Jes Fry from Norfolk Police after Michael Tucker, 50, was jailed for 26 years at Norwich Crown Court for murdering his partner Rebecca Thorpe, 28, and hiding her body in a freezer.

Read the full story on British journalism trade journal Press Gazette.

 

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30

05 2011

Citizen Journalists ask New Mayor, New Methods or Not

screenshot of tweet

From Mayor Emanuel's Chicago 2011 Tweet Stream

Citizen journalists in Chicago should be skeptical but encouraged, that newly elected Mayor Rahm Emanuel is tweeting out invitations to get involved in “[E]ffective, open and accountable government.” Everyone from citizen journalists to the mainstream media will be watching to see if open, transparent interactions with the public will continue through the transition time and into his time as mayor. The site, called Chicago 2011 is functional rather than fancy, and it says:

“City government is a large and complicated set of interlocking agencies and offices, and it can be a challenge to increase public participation and motivate civic engagement. Taxpayers deserve access to their government so that they can take part in the democratic process and hold public servants accountable. How and would you make City government more open and accountable? What parts of our government could benefit the most from public involvement?”

via Effective, open and accountable government – Chicago 2011 – Mayor-Elect Rahm Emanuel.

Minicipal government in Chicago, Ill isn’t known for being open to any outsiders, from mainstream media, to citizens or citizen journalists. In fact, the when the BBC was doing a series about “extremes,” they reached out to local reporter Steve Edwards for a story about Chicago and Illinois, called  “Oiling the Machine – Uncovering Corruption in Chicago, an audio exploration of extreme government corruption.

How bad is it? Since 1971, 1,000 Illinois public servants have been convicted of corruption, and in Chicago, 30 aldermen have gone to jail according to Dick Simpson, a former Chicago alderman who is now teaches political science department at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

In February, Chicago voters, or the 41% who turned out to vote, elected Rahm Emanuel as the next mayor. He will replace Mayor Richard M. Daley, who has been in office since 1989 Richard J. Daley, father of Richard M. also served as mayor of Chicago (1954-1976) but that is a story for another day. Emanuel’s inauguration is scheduled for May. His early actions indicate he may open up what has been the black box of information about city finances, hiring, zoning, and other matters.

Through tweets about the Chicago 2011 site, the public is being urged to go to the site and leave public comments, and get involved, during his transition time. The tweets about the site remind people they can ask questions, discuss issues, make suggestions, leave a resume, and generally keep up with the plans for Chicago under Mayor Emanuel.

As the site develops, we’ll return to it, and also track comments from Chicago’s bloggers and hyperlocal citizen media about whether it is really a break from the past in terms of transparency, or simply window dressing to cover up for “business as usual.”

 

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24

03 2011

Oil spill crisis map

Report the effects of the oil spill as you see it via text message, e-mail, Twitter, android phone, iPhone or web form. Students at Tulane University are using the Ushahidi open source software to make a live tracking-system with a map, graphs and news feed.

This map utilizes public testimony to visualize the impact of the BP oil spill over time and geography. By using information that comes from participants we will be able to track, document and make public the effects of the BP oil spill. By making all information public we will facilitate transparency, accountability and effectiveness in the oil spill response and clean up.

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25

06 2010

HBO’s ‘For Neda’

The HBO documentary, a poignant reminder of citizen journalism in the Iranian protests, debuts this summer.

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22

06 2010

NY Times rules out the "tweet"

NY Times’ standard editor has knocked “tweet” off its list of acceptable social media jargon. It’s an interesting tension between old and new definitions of culture, not unlike the infamous French ban of “e-mail.” Is it a protection from linguistic hegemony or an example of linguistic hubris?

As someone who is fortunate enough to still spend my weekdays working in the world of daily newspapers, I can respect what Corbett is allegedly trying to do — prevent his publication from alienating readers by avoiding “colloquialisms, neologisms and jargon.”

At the same time I can’t help but wonder if his point is moot.

Social media seems to be everywhere these days. If someone hasn’t already heard the word “tweet” refer to a Twitter post, update (or whatever you might call it) at least a half dozen times, they soon will.

Via PCWorld

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14

06 2010